Food label improved but it's far from enough.

Proposed changes to nutrition facts, naturopathic doctor Michigan

The FDA plans to update the current food label to make it easier to read with special attention paid to total calories and a new line called added sugar. They also hope to change the serving size to reflect how much people are really eating. This is a positive step towards a better label. The order of macronutrients; fats, carbohydrates, and proteins are in that order because fats are considered the largest health risk followed by carbohydrates and proteins. I would put carbohydrates above fats, keep the added sugar label, and add a new line that tells you the glycemic load. The current proposed changes will take years to take place. Athough I wish the FDA would have done more, some progress is better than no progress.

Proposed changes to nutrition facts, food label, nutrition facts

To read the full article go to:
Food labels to get first makeover in 20 years with new emphasis on calories, sugar.

Greetings from South Africa

Functional, Holistic Naturopathic, Integrative, Medicine, Conference Hotel in Cape Town, South Africa

Just finishing up day 3 of Functional Medicine South Africa in Cape Town. It has been a great learning experience with excellent speakers from 3 continents. I have met some great physicians that share a passion for helping people to heal. Can’t wait to start using some of the information I learned once I return to Michigan. Tomorrow I hike Table Mountain, then I’m off to a safari followed by another conference in Johannesburg.

Functional, Holistic Naturopathic, Integrative, Medicine, Conference Hotel in Cape Town, South AfricaFunctional, Holistic Naturopathic, Integrative, Medicine, Conference Hotel in Cape Town, South AfricaFunctional, Holistic Naturopathic, Integrative, Medicine, Conference Hotel in Cape Town, South Africa

Most cancers in our world pandemic are preventable

cancer is preventable Naturopathic Medicine Michigan

 

cancer is preventable

Dr. Brawley executive vice present of the American Cancer Society makes some simple suggestions to decrease your risk for cancer. Mainly don’t smoke and maintain a healthy body weight by restricting caloric intake and exercising regularly. It is now known that obesity is a risk factor for 12 cancers. Dr. Brawley does not mention the role that phytonutrients play in maintaining proper cell signaling to prevent cancer. They also serve as antioxidants to decrease DNA damage and aid in the elimination of carcinogens/xenobiotics/toxins that further disrupt cell function. I can not emphasize enough the importance of eating a nutrient dense diet with plenty of vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds. As more research becomes available I hope the American Cancer Society focuses more on where your calories come from and not just how many total you eat.